[Paleo Passover] Zucchini Noodles with Puttanesca

Another Passover meant another dozen or so hours on Pinterest looking for the perfect ways to get around my temporary dietary restrictions celebrate the festival of freedom.

I had heard of Paleo, I knew it involved no wheat, so I looked into it. Turns out, no gluten, no grains (no corn, no rice), no legumes (no soy, no peanuts). Sound familiar*?

Plus no dairy, but some people even do neo-paleo and eat dairy.

Plus, my great-grandmother didn’t have two sets of Passover dishes so she made only meat all week anyway.

So that led me to more hours searching “paleo” on Pinterest, and … I might be going paleo. Just a little. Maybe just for this week. I don’t know, I don’t buy into all the all-over health benefits and miracle digestional and autoimmune cures (plus I’m pretty healthy in that respect), but it looks like a pretty good framework for low-carb, healthy eating that might just help me lose some weight.

So, for my first really intentional Paleo meal, I present to you: Pasta on Passover!

You read that right.

Zoodles. I can’t believe people buy the crap made out of potato starch when you can make amazing spaghetti out of zucchini.

Puttanesca Zucchini Noodles

Yum! This looks sooo forbidden. It’s perfect!

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[Passover in the Fridge] French Macarons

I made these before Passover started, and I’ve been going back and forth all week over whether to share the recipe. I made a lot of mistakes with these, both things that I realized after doing them that I could have done better and ways that I didn’t follow the recipe. I finally concluded that this blog will be much more fun if I show my failures as well as my successes, so lets begin. The recipe below is what I did, but if you’re bold you should experiment with the changes I recommend. If I make these again, you’ll definitely be getting an update.

Macarons (pronounced as “macaroons” in English, but as written in French), are a fancy dessert sold in French bakeries, but their popularity is spreading. They’re a bit expensive to buy. They’re also naturally kosher for Passover (and dairy-free) because they are made with almond flour. With that in mind, I figured I would try to impress the pants off of our seder guests with a homemade, fancy French dessert.

Macarons | Found in the Fridge

A very flattering photo of the finished product

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[Passover in the Fridge] Sweet Potato Pear Soup

Sweet Potato Pear Soup | Found in the Fridge

This delicious, vegan sweet potato pear soup is perfectly light, with subtle flavors and warmth. When served with a dollop of thick Cranberry-Orange Vinaigrette and sour cream, it packs a beautiful and bold punch. I first found the recipe when I was browsing my new cookbook, Mollie Katzen’s The Heart of the Plate. I made it out of curiosity and loved it. This is the second time I’ve made it, and it always surprises and delights my audience. Mollie Katzen recommends pairing it with her Cranberry Orange Vinaigrette, and the flavors together are tart and sweet.

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[Passover in the Fridge] Quinoa Power Bites

Broccoli Quinoa Power Bites | Found in the Fridge

I had this recipe on Pinterest for the longest time to save for later. Since it featured quinoa and was (almost) kosher for Passover, I figured now was the perfect time to make them! They are so cute and yummy, full of vegetables and protein. I found this recipe on a blog that is full of great ideas and recipes – everything I have made from it has been great. I highly encourage you to check out The Slow Roasted Italian.

These are a perfect side dish with a meal, or could be an easy portable snack. They would also be great to serve as appetizers or hors d’oeuvres a party

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Passover in the Fridge

Passover is one of my favorite Jewish holidays. A celebration of slavery from Egypt, with a long seder and huge meal. Passover is the opposite of found in the fridge – everything you want to make requires special ingredients. For the most part, I stick with lots of meat, fish and vegetables, not relying too much on matza meal.

For those who are unfamiliar with Passover, the basics are that you can’t have anything leavened, which means any of the five forbidden grains (barley, rye, oats, wheat, and spelt) mixed with water. Matza is the only permitted form of these grains, having been finished within 18 minutes of the flour hitting the water. Thus, once it is fully baked, it can’t rise anymore, so things with matza meal in them don’t actually leaven. (A note on leavening: while yeast is prohibited, baking powder and soda, and other agents like seltzer, are not). There are some disagreements on whether matza meal can be used, so I’ll tag recipes that use matza with liquid as gebrokhts (the Yiddish term for these dishes). Ashkenazi (Eastern European) Jews have an extra stringency, and don’t eat legumes – no soy, peanuts, chickpeas, corn, or rice, or any products made from them.

This week is going to be full of Passover posts – a lot of desserts that I made, and some other favorite recipes as well. Some had to be adapted for Passover, others just work on their own. Continue reading