Passover in the Fridge

Passover is one of my favorite Jewish holidays. A celebration of slavery from Egypt, with a long seder and huge meal. Passover is the opposite of found in the fridge – everything you want to make requires special ingredients. For the most part, I stick with lots of meat, fish and vegetables, not relying too much on matza meal.

For those who are unfamiliar with Passover, the basics are that you can’t have anything leavened, which means any of the five forbidden grains (barley, rye, oats, wheat, and spelt) mixed with water. Matza is the only permitted form of these grains, having been finished within 18 minutes of the flour hitting the water. Thus, once it is fully baked, it can’t rise anymore, so things with matza meal in them don’t actually leaven. (A note on leavening: while yeast is prohibited, baking powder and soda, and other agents like seltzer, are not). There are some disagreements on whether matza meal can be used, so I’ll tag recipes that use matza with liquid as gebrokhts (the Yiddish term for these dishes). Ashkenazi (Eastern European) Jews have an extra stringency, and don’t eat legumes – no soy, peanuts, chickpeas, corn, or rice, or any products made from them.

This week is going to be full of Passover posts – a lot of desserts that I made, and some other favorite recipes as well. Some had to be adapted for Passover, others just work on their own. Continue reading